Front Page » Table of Contents » Archive: Policy: October 2011


Get A Job, Losers!

WICHITA, Kan. - Over 100 citizens from the Wichita metro area and people throughout Kansas met in Chisholm Creek Park to exercise their freedom of speech by protesting KOCH Industries on October 29th, 2011.

This historic rally and march was organized by a new grassroots group called "Kansans United in Voice & Spirit " with the goal of bringing together, "Concerned citizens of Kansas united to support, advocate for and protect valuable state services, programs and policies." Founders Tamara Werth and Cyrstal McComas, want to preserve such communist inspired programs like public education, Medicaid and assisting abused and neglected children. They understand that further cuts by the Kansas State Legislature and Governor Brownback will decimate the lives of Kansans just barely holding on.

The mobilization weekend events were part of a state wide grassroots effort beginning first in Kansas City then followed by a meeting in Lawrence, Kansas. People in attendance listened to speakers discuss how radical changes already in the works could drastically alter the quality of life for vulnerable Kansans and the middle class.

What Being Progressive Means to Me

HAYS, Kan. - Aside from the conservative and liberal talking-head pundits and their familiar yelling matches so prevalent on cable news channels, millions of everyday Americans believe that our elected officials, our economic leaders, and especially our newspapers and television news channels are out-of-sync with American values. Who are these millions of everyday citizens?

Many are compassionate Americans whose values are in the so-called middle and/or leaning to the near left or far left. Many of these passionate, active and optimistic citizens describe themselves as progressive thinkers, progressive doers, progressive writers or progressive voters.

Are moderates and progressives the same then? Often times yes, but not necessarily. Are liberals and progressives the same? Maybe, frequently, and probably, but still not quite the same.

WICHITA, Kan. - It was a rainy Saturday in Wichita on October 8, but there was still a decent turnout for the Occupy Wichita (OW) event on E. Douglass. There were about 50 to 80 people there. Perhaps a little more than the previous Sunday. The crowd fell short of the 500 that some of the OW activists were hoping for. But it was a spirited gathering. It didn't seem to be just the same people as on Sunday. For one thing, there were a number of union folks present, from the SEIU, IAM, APWU, IBEW, and Teamsters. I also talked, as well as members of Move-on, Wichita Democratic Socialists, Sunflower Community Action, and the Tequila Party.

There is a nightly gathering around 4:30 - 5 pm at the Chester Lewis Reflection Park Square, on E Douglas between Broadway and Market.

A bigger rally is planned for Saturday October 15 at noon on the theme of "jobs, not cuts." If NYC Mayor Bloomberg follows through with plans to disperse Occupy Wall Street on Friday, there could be an even bigger turnout.

U.S. Not Moving Towards Socialism

SALINA, Kan. - Recently I came across a quote by a Republican politician who was lamenting the success of Democrats in a recent election. He said, "I don't know what caused it ... voters must be tending more towards Socialism or something."

At first glance the remark sounds like a contemporary one about President Barack Obama and his political allies. But it actually came from the November 5, 1958 edition of my hometown newspaper. That particular year Democrats won three of the then six congressional seats in Kansas, elected a Democratic governor and gained fourteen seats in the Kansas Legislature.

The more things change the more they stay the same. Hardly a week goes by these days without a commentator, either professional or one on the street, issuing dire warnings about how President Obama has us on the path towards Socialism. If history has anything to teach us that complaint is becoming passé.

Wall Street Woes (Part 2)

COLBY, Kan. - It takes radical demonstrations in the street, sometimes, to focus public attention on police brutality. It took radical demonstrations in the streets to bring the civil rights issues into public scrutiny in the late fifties and sixties of the 20th century. Those demonstrators didn't have the power to enact legislation or laws, but they had the power to wake up a nation to the inequities of our social structures.

Taken from an editorial published in the New York Times, Oct 8.

It is not the job of the protesters to draft legislation. That's the job of the nation's leaders, and if they had been doing it all along there might not be a need for these marches and rallies. Because they have not, the public airing of grievances is a legitimate and important end in itself. It is also the first line of defense against a return to the Wall Street ways that plunged the nation into an economic crisis from which it has yet to emerge.

We have more! This page only lists entries in a particular month. We encourage you to look back through our archives in this same category.

The previous archive is Policy: September 2011. The next archive is Policy: November 2011.

If you want to browse other topics, you can also check our Table of Contents. The most current posts can always be found on our Front Page.


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This is an archive page containing all of the stories posted to Kansas Free Press in one particular topic in a particular month. These stories were published in the Policy: October 2011 section.

The previous archive is Policy: September 2011. The next archive is Policy: November 2011.

The most current posts can always be found on our Front Page.

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