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TOPEKA, Kan. - From KNEA News...

The state-wide coalition Kansans for Quality Communities (KQC) held a press conference in the capitol today at which they called upon legislators to pass a tax increase to support vital state services and keep Kansas communities strong.

Speaking at the press conference were KNEA lobbyist Mark Desetti, Kansas Organization of State Employees Executive Director Jane Carter, Statewide Independent Living Council of Kansas Executive Director Shannon Jones, InterHab Assistant Executive Director Matt Fletcher, and Kansas Families for Education Executive Director Kathy Cook.

"The people of Kansas have elected their legislators to put the needs of all Kansans ahead of political expediency or ideology. Today more than ever, we are in need of a legislature that can set aside partisanship and demonstrate a spirit of collaboration and cooperation in the quest to preserve and ultimately strengthen our state and our communities," said Desetti.

PhotobucketTOPEKA, Kan. - This week both the Senate Ways and Means and House Appropriations Committees are meeting to develop a budget.

Senate Ways and Means began meeting Monday and completed work on their budget Wednesday afternoon. The committee recommended a budget that would require an estimated $500 million in additional revenue but they could not reach agreement on a tax package to pay for it. Chairman Jay Emler, R-Lindsborg, abruptly ended the meeting, announcing, "We are adjourned until the 28th," - the date when the entire legislature returns to Topeka for the veto session.

On the House side, Representative Kevin Yoder continues to say that the legislature must CUT, CUT, CUT. As I have reported earlier, Yoder represents a brand of politician whose intention is to destroy government and leave everything to the market to fix. Such ideology is not what the people of Kansans need. We need leaders who understand government serves a positive purpose.

Ahoy, Matey!

YOCEMENTO, Kan. - A storm was brewing in the north, but there was nothing but peace and good cheer around our kitchen table last Thursday evening. My family and I had the privilege of hosting Nola Ochs and her great-granddaughter Janae Ochs for dinner.

I took an Old Testament class with Nola in the fall of 2006, where we first met. It was her first semester as an on-campus student. On the first day of class, we went around and introduced ourselves with a brief bit about why we were taking the class. Nola said that she was interested in the Bible. She tagged on at the end that she was 94.

There were no gasps or applause from the class; instead there were a few indulgent smiles. How quaint that this elderly woman wants to better understand the history of the Bible. Most likely the professor will go easy on her. After all, she's 94 years old. But we soon found out that Nola Ochs was no shrinking violet. She spoke up with thoughtful, relevant remarks, wrote papers and took exams.

GREAT BEND, Kan. - When I was a boy, there was a phrase, a sentence, that I heard often: "Help those less fortunate." My parents used this phrase often, the nuns at St. Patrick's Catholic School used it, my leaders in Boy Scouts of America used it. And it became part of who I am.

As an adult in 2010, I no longer hear that phrase, but I still try to live it. The injunction to "help those less fortunate," is totally out of date in 2010 America. And I think I know why: because it implies that good luck has something to do with success. And that bad luck has something to do with being poor. And many successful people today want to believe they alone caused their success, and that the poor failed because they have some moral defect.

America has a larger class division than ever in my lifetime. The rich get richer, the middle class is shrinking, and the ranks of the poor grow every day. And some successful people believe they achieved success on their own, that no one -- government, or the community, or anyone -- had anything to do with it.

And the poor? They screwed up.

We have more! This page only lists entries in a particular month. We encourage you to look back through our archives in this same category.

The previous archive is Education: March 2010. The next archive is Education: May 2010.

If you want to browse other topics, you can also check our Table of Contents. The most current posts can always be found on our Front Page.


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This is an archive page containing all of the stories posted to Kansas Free Press in one particular topic in a particular month. These stories were published in the Education: April 2010 section.

The previous archive is Education: March 2010. The next archive is Education: May 2010.

The most current posts can always be found on our Front Page.

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